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Four XL Bullys are ‘urgently’ seeking homes ahead of ban in Scotland on February 23 as animal welfare charity SPCA calls for overhaul of ‘outdated’ dangerous dogs act

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An animal welfare charity is ‘urgently’ seeking homes for four XL bully type dogs before a ban is introduced in Scotland on February 23. 

The Scottish Government announced in January it would be replicate legislation in England and Wales which outlawed the the breeding, selling or abandonment of the dogs. 

The Scottish SPCA condemned the new legislation, as it seeks homes for two dogs confirmed to meet the characteristics of XL bullies, and two other dogs which might meet the physical conformation standard.

The animal charity branded the Dangerous Dogs Act ‘outdated’ and said any dog could be ‘out of control and dangerous’, describing the four dogs seeking homes as thriving with training and affection. 

Paddington, aged two; Lex, aged one; and bitches Praline, aged around two; and Duchess, aged three; have undergone ‘enhanced behavioural assessments’ by the charity. 

The Scottish Government announced in January it would be replicate legislation in England and Wales which outlawed the the breeding, selling or abandonment of  Xl Bullys 

The Scottish SPCA is seeking homes for two dogs confirmed to meet the characteristics of XL bullies, and two other dogs which might meet the physical conformation standard

The Scottish SPCA is seeking homes for two dogs confirmed to meet the characteristics of XL bullies, and two other dogs which might meet the physical conformation standard

The animal charity branded the Dangerous Dogs Act 'outdated' and said any dog could be 'out of control and dangerous', describing the four dogs seeking homes as thriving with training and affection

The animal charity branded the Dangerous Dogs Act ‘outdated’ and said any dog could be ‘out of control and dangerous’, describing the four dogs seeking homes as thriving with training and affection

The dogs - all living in centres in Glasgow, Aberdeenshire and Lanarkshire - have been microchipped, neutered and given a clean bill of health, the SPCA says

The dogs – all living in centres in Glasgow, Aberdeenshire and Lanarkshire – have been microchipped, neutered and given a clean bill of health, the SPCA says

The dogs – all living in centres in Glasgow, Aberdeenshire and Lanarkshire – have been microchipped, neutered and given a clean bill of health, the SPCA says. 

Paddington, a bulldog from Glasgow, was described as a ‘cuddly bear’, while Praline was found tied up and is being rehomed in Lanarkshire.

In Aberdeenshire, American bulldog Duchess was said to be ‘incredibly sweet’, and Lex, a crossbreed, could be someone’s ‘new best friend’ and had the potential to live in a household with cat.

Jennie Macdonald, head of rehoming, fostering and community engagement, said: ‘It will become illegal for us to rehome these dogs if they have not found homes by February 23.

‘Our four dogs at Aberdeenshire, Glasgow and Lanarkshire animal rescue and rehoming centres which meet, or might, meet the physical conformation standard of an XL bully type breed have undergone enhanced behavioural assessments with our behaviour team.

‘The process of ensuring they are ready for rehoming has been ongoing for some months while the situation in Scotland has been unclear. They have been microchipped, neutered and given a clean bill of health.

‘We welcome contact from prospective owners with a secure garden who can offer a forever home to these lovely dogs.’

Claire Haynes, head of animal behaviour at the Scottish SPCA, added: ‘All our animals for rehoming go thorough comprehensive medical and behavioural assessments.

‘This has been an ongoing process for some months with our XL bully type dogs while the situation in Scotland has been unknown.

‘After an enhanced assessment, Duchess and Praline meet the physical conformation standards of an XL bully type breed. Paddington and Lex are still to be formally assessed, but could be typed as XL bully dogs.

‘We continue to call for the principle of deed not breed to be applied, and for the outdated Dangerous Dogs legislation to be overhauled.

‘Any breed of dog can be potentially out of control and dangerous in the wrong hands.’

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