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Two stunning ‘hidden waterfalls’ in Scotland named among best in UK

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TWO of Scotland’s “hidden waterfalls” have been named among the best in the UK.

The UK is home to some amazing natural sights and scenery all over the country.

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Crawton Waterfall was the eighth most popular hidden UK waterfallCredit: Getty
Carbost Burn beat the Fairy Pools and Crawton to snatch number 2 on the list

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Carbost Burn beat the Fairy Pools and Crawton to snatch number 2 on the list

Staycation specialists at Sally Cottage’s analysed data on TikTok to reveal the “top 10 hidden waterfall walks” in the UK.

Carbost Burn on the idyllic Isle of Skye ranked second in the list for its dramatic scenes following heavy rain.

The hidden gem is one of the easiest to find on the peaceful island, as it can be found on the burn, which feeds Talisker Distillery.

Beating the more-known Fairy Pools in Glen Brittle.

It is nestled among greenery and hills, with a clear blue pool at the bottom of the cascading water feature.

Crawton Waterfall, just outside the former fishing village of Crawton in Aberdeenshire, ranked eighth on the UK list.

It is known for the water dropping down a rugged cliff into the sea below.

However, the top waterfall in the UK can be found in Wales on the northern edge of Snowdonia National Park in Gwydir Forest.

Rhaeadr y Parc Mawr has two waterfalls that falls into a shallow pool beneath.

It comes after the Devil‘s Pulpit hit the headlines following positive reviews of the mythical waterfall.

However, the landmark isn’t a waterfall but a mushroom-shaped grassy stone that pokes out of the riverbed below the tiny waterfall.

It is located near Loch Lomond and is actually known as Finnich Glen but has colloquially become known as the Devil‘s Pulpit.

Legend has it that the devil would address his followers on the rock as the red water flowed underneath.

The pigment from the river’s sandstone bed gives the water its red hue, making it look like blood is flowing through the tiny gorge.

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